mobile (5)


iBeacons In Real Life

The State of iBeacons (June 2015)

This is pretty consistent with my experiences. On observation I’d add  about squirrely RSSI values – readings walk around a bit. You’ll do better to calculate a moving average and toss out the occasional 0 reading. Also be mindful of your iBeacon’s power settings – you may need to calculate your own distance from the RSSI value if the device isn’t transmitting at the default power expected by iOS. Even so, distance may not be entirely accurate. Take it with a grain of salt.




Introducing: Pocket Coach Pro

This project has been near and dear to my heart long before I wrote a single line of code. That said, I think it’s understandable I”m pretty nervous about this pre-announcement. BUT, I also look forward to helping people change their lives for the better. Count this as a semi / unofficial announcement. :)

Several years ago I started getting more serious about my health and began searching for fitness methods that worked. I actually had a lot of trouble finding something that gave me results and was interesting enough to keep doing it. Running wasn’t it. Getting to local hiking spots was too time consuming. Attending the big gym down the road was overwhelming with all those machines (and therefore ineffective). Personal training was way too expensive. What I found wasn’t a set or specific routine or program that gets old after a while (you know those videos you can buy). It also wasn’t a fad celebrity workout.

It took a few years, but things finally started to click. I wanted something that reflected functional fitness to prepare me for “life,” and I needed structure to tell me what I should be doing.  I also wanted a system that was efficient and effective. I’ve been doing this for a few years now, and I can say that it works for a wide range of fitness levels. Most importantly, this system is sustainable for a healthy lifestyle.

Visit Pocket Coach Pro

The app isn’t quite done yet, but we’re getting there. Count this as a first look as we start to get the name out in the wild. Head on over and sign up if you’re at all interested. From time to time I’ll send out sneak peeks, some insider-only info, and I’ll throw in a little bonus for you to make it worth your while. And don’t worry – I don’t do the spam thing. I treat you the way I would also like to be treated – with respect.

I have no set launch date, but it will initially be available for iPhone / iPad, and likely thoughtful integration with Apple Watch.




Why I’m Excited about watch OS 2

For those who don’t already know, I have Repetition Workout Counter in the AppStore for iPhone and iPad. The most recent release – version 2.0 – added support for Apple Watch from day one.

I didn’t quite know what to expect out of the Apple Watch. It’s quite an elegant piece of hard ware and software engineering. That is, until you start using third-party apps. The issues I (well, and many others) have is that running the app as an extension on the phone and communicating UI changes over Bluetooth has been problematic. It’s slow. Sometimes it doesn’t connect.

In the case of Repetition, it only does two things – increment a counter, and control the stopwatch function. At times even these are painfully slow – and I’m only sending minimal payloads (most often a single key:value pair) over the air to the Watch.

Now, enter watchOS 2, announced yesterday at WWDC. This is what we developers have been waiting for – the ability to run apps natively on the Watch, some UI improvements, access to hardware components, complications, and more.

For apps like Repetition, that means some key advantages over WatchKit:

  • Immediate UI updates. (counter and timer are immediate)
  • Haptic feedback from the taptic engine (say, a little buzz every X minutes)
  • Better heart rate monitoring
  • No need to be near your phone during workouts.
  • Watch face complications with the current reps and timer w/o having to open the app

So, you can see why we’re excited for these enhancements. I really think the watch is perfect for two things – notifications and exercise. With Apple pushing the Health aspect so much, I wouldn’t be surprised if they felt the same way.




Measuring Perceived Performance

Measuring user perceived latency | Foursquare Engineering Blog.

I’ve found one of the most important components of performance is the perception. Within reason, the actual performance doesn’t matter as much as how people perceive actions to be progressing and completing.

This is about the user’s experience.

Consider the two possible experiences of loading a web page. In one version – the browser waits until all content is loaded. The other version – the browser progressively loads content, as we’re typically used to. Which one will feel faster, less frustrating, and more “productive”?

Are you doing the same in your app? Luke W explains it well in his post about content loading spinners.




Raising the Bar on Real

Apple Outsider » Real.

We don’t need the deception of “photorealism” anymore. Despite the loss of these tricks, iOS 7 feels more real. The parallax effect conveys an entire living world under that glass, not just abstract pictures and icons.

On the surface, iOS 7 looks like a refreshed UI, and nothing more. But digging deeper and looking closer, we have entirely new channels of user experience and interaction design opened up to us – not because we can (we always could) – but because it’s the new status quo. The bar has been raised.